Daniel Sender, Concertmaster

The Mary Dean Scott Chair

dls8kb@virginia.edu

dan sender-2245[1]Daniel Sender enjoys a diverse musical career and has appeared in concerts throughout the United States, Canada, Europe and China.  A frequent guest principal artist with chamber and symphony orchestras throughout the region, he currently serves as Concertmaster of the Charlottesville Symphony, Ash Lawn Opera and the Virginia Consort.

Dan Sender was a Fulbright Scholar in Budapest and attended the Franz Liszt Academy of Music as a student of Vilmos Szabadi.  He was formerly the first violinist of the Adelphi String Quartet, which held a fellowship residency at the University of Maryland, and was for four years the violinist of the Annapolis Chamber Players.  He has recorded for the Centaur, Sono Luminus and Bifrost Arts labels.

Named a Presser Scholar by the Theodore Presser Foundation, Sender has received numerous grants and awards that funded research and performances throughout Europe. Recent performances include a featured recital at the Hungarian Embassy in Washington, DC and a solo recital in Old Cabell Hall showcasing the premier of two original arrangements.  He is on the faculty of the University of Virginia’s McIntire Department of Music and Interlochen’s Adult Chamber Music Camp, and has held a performance faculty position at Liberty University.

As a chamber musician, Dan Sender has performed with members of the Audubon Quartet and Axelrod and Left Bank quartets, and spent two years working intensively under the mentorship of the Guarneri Quartet. Chamber concerts have taken him to venues around the world including the Kennedy Center, Bartók Hall of the Erdödy Palace (Budapest), Smithsonian Museum of American History, Universität der Kunste (Berlin) and the Museum of Fine Arts (Montreal).

A native of Philadelphia, Sender attended Ithaca College, the University of Maryland, the Liszt Academy (Budapest) and the Institute for European Studies (Vienna).  His primary teachers include Vilmos Szabadi, David Salness, Arnold Steinhardt, René Staar, and Gerald Fischbach.

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