David Sariti, Violin

The Robert D. Cross Memorial Chair

djs6k@virginia.edu

SaritiViolinist David Sariti maintains a career of uncommonly diverse musical accomplishments, with a repertoire spanning from the seventeenth century to the present day. An active recitalist and chamber musician, he has appeared in recent months as guest artist at universities throughout the East and Midwest. He joined the faculty at the University of Virginia in 2005, where he maintains a studio of violin students, coaches chamber music and directs the Baroque Orchestra and the Palladian Chamber Orchestra, a conductorless student ensemble. He performs at UVA in the Rivanna Quartet and other faculty chamber collaborations, and as Principal Second Violinist of the Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia.

He was commissioned by the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts to premiere an award-winning work by composer Anna Weesner. Also accomplished on the Baroque violin, he performs frequently with the Washington Bach Consort and in collaboration with harpsichordist Bradley Lehman. He has edited a violin sonata from 1657 by Heinrich Lizkau for its first-ever publication by Prima la musica!. His interest in early music has lead to research and a series of programs for Monticello on music from the collection of Thomas Jefferson, culminating in the recently-released CD Music from the Jefferson Collection.

Dr. Sariti has taught violin and music history at the Hartt School, and is an author dedicated to the advancement of string pedagogy. His articles have been regularly featured in American String Teacher, California Music Teacher, and American Music Teacher. He completed his doctorate at the Hartt School (University of Hartford) in the Honors Chamber Music program, writing on “The Austro-German Violin Sonata, c. 1650”. He also holds degrees from the University of Akron and Ithaca College. Studies were with Katie Lansdale, Pamela Gearhart, Pamela Frank and members of the Cleveland and Miami Quartets. He performs on a violin by the noted Boston maker Andrew Ryan, from 1997.

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